Prepositions of Place: “In” “On” & “At”

Last week we discussed how the small connecting words of the English language are just as important as mastering a larger vocabulary… but the correct usage of these tiny words can sometimes fall through the cracks for non-native English speakers. You may start to use words like “in,” “on,” and “at” interchangeably, when they actually each have a specific purpose. Incorrect usage of these prepositions can cause native English speakers to question your fluency, or become confused by your meaning.

 

when do you say (place)

 

Last week, we looked at how to use “in,” “on,” and “at” when describing time… This week, we’ll follow the same principle when using them to describe locations.

 

If you can remember this order, “IN, ON, AT”… then you can remember this general rule for how to describe places:

 

gen rule place

 

See again how “IN, ON, AT” progress from general to specific locations as you read their descriptions:

 

Prepositions of Place

 

I have some more sample sentences for you again this week. Take a look and choose the correct prepositions for each location.

 

Fill In Place

 

This video I created a few years ago further explains the usage of “IN, ON, AT” with regard to location beyond what I’ve detailed here. Check it out and then look below to see if you got the sample sentences correct!

 

 

Answers Place

If this video and information helped you, or if you’d like more information on accent reduction, take my free accent screening and receive a free pronunciation guide at losemyaccent.com.

THIS WEEK: Personalized Accent Reduction Course Begins

The story with most of my clients is the same: they have studied English for years and consider themselves fluent, but are still misunderstood and constantly asked to repeat themselves.

 

Struggle With

 

It’s disruptive to their work and social lives, and taking another generic English class won’t help.

 

Accent makes you feel like

 

Is this where you are today?

 

Then you need my online course that starts THIS THURSDAY JUNE 9!

 

SALT

 

Speaking and Learning Together (SALT) is designed to focus on increasing your awareness of the nuances of English and improving your pronunciation and conversational skills. 

With online videos, group question and answer sessions, and detailed homework assignments, you can be speaking more clearly by the end of summer!

 

My video below details the valuable resources this course will offer you.

 

2016-06-05 (2)

 

Sign up here

This course is valued at $800, but I’m offering it at an extra-low price.

And after you reserve your spot, you can BRING A FRIEND FOR FREE!

Having a friend to practice with is crucial to the encouragement of reducing your accent.

 

Here’s a quick rundown of what you’ll receive.

course includes

 

Check out the SALT page to register and learn more about how the course works.

 

It’s my passion to use my proven speech pathology methods to help you lose your accent and lead a more fulfilling life.

 

REGISTER NOW and your accent reduction journey begins THIS THURSDAY, JUNE 9!

Can’t wait to see you there!

Make Your Own Games to Improve Spoken English

Episode #14: American Accent: What’s Growing in Your Speech Garden?

 

 

How’s your Spring Training Going?

American Pronunciation of Stare and Steer: What’s the Difference?

Welcome! In this video, you get some American pronunciation practice as we talk about the difference between the words stare and steer. We’ll talk about the double meanings of each word and how they are pronounced, and you will improve your American accent as you learn how to say each sound.

 

Episode #1 – Your New Year’s American Pronunciation goals

 

Transcript:

Hi, It’s Lisa Scott with losemyaccent.com. Have you written your New Year’s Resolutions or set those New Year’s goals? I will tell you in just a minute why that might not be a good idea.

But first, I want to share with you how excited I am about some of the new developments we have here at Accentuate. One of the biggest changes is that we are moving to much more video this year. When you ask pronunciation questions, it is so much easier for me to explain them when you can actually see what I’m explaining. So, starting today, the majority of my blog posts will be videos rather than written articles.

You have asked for some lower priced video trainings, and those are coming as well. I have an all new 6 week series that is almost ready for you, so I’ll be sharing the details very soon. I can tell you that since my birthday is at the end of January, I will be running a very special birthday sale as I launch this new series.

And lastly, I have started a Facebook page that is just for us to talk about your questions and concerns regarding American pronunciation. So, come visit me at www.facebook.com/losemyaccent and tell your friends to join us too. Introduce yourself, share your concerns with learning English, and ask your questions about pronunciation, grammar, intonation – whatever is on your mind! I will try to answer simple questions on the page and I will choose some of them as topics for future blog post videos. I’m really looking forward to connecting with you there!

And now, back to my comment at the beginning on why New Year’s Resolutions might not be a good idea.  People make them every year and every year they get frustrated because they just can’t stick with them. But what if instead of focusing on the specific goal, you focus on the outcome, or who you want to be when you meet that goal. Let’s take the example of setting a goal to reduce your accent. You could set a measurable goal of improving 50% on a pronunciation test, and that would be great. But you don’t really care if you score 50% higher on that test, do you? What you really care about is being understood more easily, not having to repeat yourself, and feeling confident when you speak English. Right? Those are outcomes rather than goals, and it is those outcomes that truly make you feel like you’ve accomplished your goal.

So, how do you change your focus? First, you think about your goals for the year one by one and think about how you will be different when you meet that goal. What will you gain by meeting that goal? What will the outcome be? That is your true motivator and the way to help you stay focused to accomplish that goal.

And if one of your goals is to improve your American pronunciation, and the outcome you are looking for is to be understood more easily and feel more confident when you speak, then I hope you will be an active part of our community this year. Watch these videos, share your questions on the facebook page, and let me know what I can do to serve you as you work towards the outcomes you desire in 2013.

See you next time!

 

 

Eye Halve a Spelling Chequer Contest

Today’s post is a contest I ran a couple of years ago, but since we have added lots of new readers since then, I decided to post it again – and yes, I am running the contest again, too. Be sure to send me your entry!

Ever get frus­trated try­ing to improve your spo­ken Eng­lish by read­ing writ­ten Eng­lish? Or won­der why two words that are spelled com­pletely dif­fer­ently are pro­nounced exactly the same? With cer­tain words, you have to hear them in con­text in order to fig­ure out which word, and which spelling, was intended.

lose my accent spellcheck

Today’s entry is a humor­ous look at how using spellcheck on your com­puter might sub­sti­tute cor­rectly spelled words in a com­pletely wrong con­text. Give your­self a spelling chal­lenge and see if you can fig­ure out how the words really should be spelled.

To make it more fun, I’m turn­ing it into a contest!

Here’s how the con­test works: Rewrite the poem with the cor­rect spellings for the con­text, leave a comment below telling me what you’d like to learn in your free coaching session, and then e-mail your completed poem to me at lisa at losemyaccent dot com. Don’t post your corrected poem below- just let me know what you’d like to learn if you win the free session! From all the cor­rect entries, I will select one win­ner on Wednesday, August 21st to receive a free 30 minute coach­ing ses­sion with me! This is a $50 value! We can work on pro­nun­ci­a­tion, gram­mar, idioms, or other Eng­lish top­ics. It’s up to you!

Please share this with your friends on FB, Twit­ter, and other sites; I want as many peo­ple as pos­si­ble to have a chance to win! Good luck!

Here’s the poem:

Eye halve a spelling che­quer
It came with my pea sea
It plainly mar­ques four my revue
Miss steaks eye kin knot sea.

Eye strike a key and type a word
And weight four it two say
Weather eye am wrong oar write
It shows me strait a weigh.

As soon as a mist ache is maid
It nose bee fore two long
And eye can put the error rite
Its rarely ever wrong.

Eye have run this poem threw it
I am shore your pleased two no
Its let­ter per­fect in it’s weigh
My che­quer tolled me sew.

— Sauce unknown

 

Don’t for­get — when you fig­ure it out, post a comment below to tell what you’d like to learn in your free coaching session, then e-mail me your poem. Check back on Thursday, August 23rd to see if you are the lucky winner!

Share with your friends by clicking on the buttons below:

 

Do you have a HOT dog or a hot DOG? Word Stress is a key to your American Accent

It’s National Hot Dog Day, and I’m celebrating with you by giving you this video training! Using correct word stress is an important part of mastering the American accent. This video explains what happens if you use the wrong word stress when talking about the all-American hot dog!